Using Microsoft Teams

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  1. How To Teach Using Microsoft Teams
  2. Using Microsoft Teams Cvr
  3. Using Microsoft Teams Pdf

3 key ways Microsoft Teams enriches higher education teaching and learning. Whether remotely, in class or hybrid, Microsoft Teams helps to simplify and structure higher education’s day-to-day digital environment – integrating seamlessly with all the solutions you’re already using. “My teaching is now entirely based on Teams. 3 key ways Microsoft Teams enriches higher education teaching and learning. Whether remotely, in class or hybrid, Microsoft Teams helps to simplify and structure higher education’s day-to-day digital environment – integrating seamlessly with all the solutions you’re already using. “My teaching is now entirely based on Teams. Team owners can manage team-wide settings directly in Microsoft Teams. Settings include the ability to add a team picture, set permissions across team members for creating standard and private channels, adding tabs and connectors, @mentioning the entire team or channel, and the usage of GIFs, stickers, and memes.

Note

Review the following information to understand chat, teams, channels, & apps in Teams. Then, go to Chat, teams, channels, & apps in Teams to walk through a list of decisions important to your Teams rollout.

Let’s get started by thinking about how Microsoft Teams allows individual teams to self-organize and collaborate across business scenarios:

Using Microsoft Teams
  • Teams are a collection of people, content, and tools surrounding different projects and outcomes within an organization.

    • Teams can be created to be private to only invited users.
    • Teams can also be created to be public and open and anyone within the organization can join (up to 10,000 members).

    A team is designed to bring together a group of people who work closely to get things done. Teams can be dynamic for project-based work (for example, launching a product, creating a digital war room), as well as ongoing, to reflect the internal structure of your organization (for example, departments and office locations). Conversations, files and notes across team channels are only visible to members of the team.

  • Channels are dedicated sections within a team to keep conversations organized by specific topics, projects, disciplines—-whatever works for your team! Files that you share in a channel (on the Files tab) are stored in SharePoint. To learn more, read How SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business interact with Teams.

    • Channels are places where conversations happen and where the work actually gets done. Channels can be open to all team members or, if you need a more select audience, they can be private. Standard channels are for conversations that everyone in a team can participate in and private channels limit communication to a subset of people in a team.
    • Channels are most valuable when extended with apps that include tabs, connectors, and bots that increase their value to the members of the team. To learn more, see Apps, bots, & connectors in Teams.

For help using teams and channels, check out Teams and channels.

View this short video to learn more about best practices for creating teams and channels.

Membership, roles, and settings

Team membership

When Microsoft Teams is activated for your entire organization, designated team owners can invite any employee they work with to join their team. Microsoft Teams makes it easy for team owners to add people in the organization based on their name. Depending on your organization's settings guests who are team members but outside of your organization can also be added to your teams. See Guest Access in Microsoft Teams for more information.

Team owners can also create a team based on an existing Microsoft 365 group. Any changes made to the group will be synced with Microsoft Teams automatically. Creating a team based on an existing Microsoft 365 group not only simplifies the process of inviting and managing members, but also syncs group files inside of Microsoft Teams.

Team roles

There are two main roles in Microsoft Teams:

  • Team owner - The person who creates the team. Team owners can make any member of their team a co-owner when they invite them to the team or at any point after they’ve joined the team. Having multiple team owners lets you share the responsibilities of managing settings and membership, including invitations.
  • Team members - The people who the owners invite to join their team.

In addition, if moderation is set up, team owners and members can have moderator capabilities for a channel. Moderators can start new posts in the channel and control whether team members can reply to existing channel messages. Team owners can assign moderators within a channel. (Team owners have moderator capabilities by default.) Moderators within a channel can add or remove other moderators within that channel. For more information, see Set up and manage channel moderation in Microsoft Teams.

Team settings

Teams

Team owners can manage team-wide settings directly in Microsoft Teams. Settings include the ability to add a team picture, set permissions across team members for creating standard and private channels, adding tabs and connectors, @mentioning the entire team or channel, and the usage of GIFs, stickers, and memes.

Take three minutes to check out this go-to-guide video for team owners:

If you are a Microsoft Teams administrator in Microsoft 365 or Office 365, you have access to system-wide settings in the Microsoft Teams admin center. These settings can impact the options and defaults team owners see under team settings. For example, you can enable a default channel, “General”, for team-wide announcements, discussions, and resources, which will appear across all teams.

By default, all users have permissions to create a team within Microsoft Teams (to modify this, see Assign roles and permissions in Teams. Users of an existing Microsoft 365 group can also enhance their permissions with Teams functionality.

One key early planning activity to engage users with Microsoft Teams is to help people think and understand how Teams can enhance collaboration in their day to day lives. Talk with people and help them select business scenarios where they are currently collaborating in fragmented ways. Bring them together in a channel with the relevant tabs that will help them get their work done. One of the most powerful use cases of Teams is any cross-organizational process.

Example Teams

Below are a few functional examples of how different types of users may approach setting up their teams, channels, and apps (tabs/connectors/bots). This may be useful to help kick off a conversation about Microsoft Teams with your user community. As you think about how to implement Microsoft Teams in your organization, remember that you can provide guidance on how to structure their teams; however, users have control of how they can self-organize. These are just examples to help get teams to start thinking through the possibilities.

Microsoft Teams is great for breaking down organizational silos and promoting cross-functional teams, so encourage your users to think about functional teams rather than organizational boundaries.

Types of TeamsPotential ChannelsApps (Tabs /Connectors /Bots )
SalesAnnual Sales Meeting
Quarterly Business Review
Monthly Sales Pipeline Review
Sales Playbook
Power BI
Trello
CRM
Summarize Bot
Public RelationsPress Releases
News and Updates
Fact Checking
RSS Feed
Twitter
Event PlanningMarketing
Logistics and Scheduling
Venue
Budget
Twitter
Facebook
Planner
PDF
Marketing/Go to MarketMarket Research
Messaging Pillars
Communications Plan
Marketing Bill of Materials
YouTube
Microsoft Stream
Twitter
MailChimp
Technical OperationsIncident Management
Sprint Planning
Work Items
Infrastructure and Operations
Team Services
Jira
AzureBot
Product TeamStrategy
Marketing
Sales
Operations
Insights
Services & Support
Power BI
Team Services
FinanceCurrent Fiscal
FY Planning
Forecasting
Accounts Receivable
Accounts Payable
Power BI
Google Analytics
LogisticsWarehouse Operations
Vehicle Maintenance
Driver Rosters
Weather Service
Travel / Road Disruptions
Planner
Tubot
UPS Bot
HRTalent Management
Recruiting
Performance Review Planning
Morale
HR Tools
External Job Posting Sites
Growbot
Cross-organizational
Virtual Team
Strategy
Workforce Development
Compete & Research
Power BI
Microsoft Stream

It's possible to create Teams that align with the organizational structure. This is best used for leaders who want to drive morale, have team-specific reviews, clarify employee onboarding processes, discuss workforce plans, and increase visibility across a diverse workforce.

Org-wide teams

If your organization has no more than 5,000 users, you can create an org-wide team. Org-wide teams provide an automatic way for everyone in an organization to be a part of a single team for collaboration. For more information, including best practices for creating and managing an org-wide team, see Create an org-wide team in Microsoft Teams.

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The Teams Meeting add-in lets users schedule a Teams meeting from Outlook. The add-in is available for Outlook on Windows, Mac, web, and mobile.

Teams Meeting add-in in Outlook for Windows

The Teams Meeting add-in is automatically installed for users who have Microsoft Teams and either Office 2013, Office 2016, or Office 2019 installed on their Windows PC. Users will see the Teams Meeting add-in on the Outlook Calendar ribbon.

Note

  • There is no direct URL that links to the Teams add-in.
  • There are additional considerations if your organization runs both Teams and Skype for Business. Under some circumstances, the Teams add-in is not available in Outlook. See Upgrade from Skype for Business to Teams for details.
  • User permissions to execute the Regsvr32.exe file is a minimum requirement for the Teams Meeting add-in to be installed on the computer.
  • If users do not see the Teams Meeting add-in, instruct them to close Outlook and Teams, then restart the Teams client first, then sign in to Teams, and then restart the Outlook client, in that specific order.
  • If you are using an Office Outlook installation from the Microsoft Store, the Teams Meeting add-in isn't supported. Users who require this add-in are advised to install Click-to-Run version of Office, as outlined in Office on Windows 10 in S mode article.

Teams Meeting add-in in Outlook for Mac

The Teams Meeting button in Outlook for Mac will appear in the Outlook for Mac ribbon if Outlook is running production build 16.24.414.0 and later and is activated with a Microsoft 365 or Office 365 client subscription.​

The meeting coordinates (the Teams join link and dial-in numbers) will be added to the meeting invite after the user clicks Send.

Teams Meeting add-in in Outlook Web App

The Teams Meetings button in Outlook Web App will appear as part of new event creation if the user is on an early version of the new Outlook on the web. See the Outlook Blog to learn about how users can try the early version of the new Outlook on the web.

The meeting coordinates (the Teams join link and dial-in numbers) will be added to the meeting invite after the user clicks Send.

Teams Meeting add-in in Outlook mobile (iOS and Android)

The Teams Meeting button shows up in latest builds of the Outlook iOS and Android app.

The meeting coordinates (the Teams join link and dial-in numbers) will be added to the meeting invite after the user clicks Send.

Teams Meeting add-in and FindTime for Outlook

FindTime is an add-in for Outlook that helps users reach consensus on a meeting time across companies. Once the meeting invitees have provided their preferred times, FindTime sends out the meeting invite on the user's behalf. If the Online meeting option is selected in FindTime, FindTime will schedule a Skype for Business or Microsoft Teams meeting. (FindTime will use whichever has been set by your organization as the default online meeting channel.)

Note

If you saved a Skype for Business setting in your Findtime dashboard, FindTime will use that instead of Microsoft Teams. If you want to use Microsoft Teams, delete the Skype for Business setting in your dashboard.

For more information, see Schedule meetings with FindTime.

Authentication requirements

The Teams Meeting add-in requires users to sign in to Teams using Modern Authentication. If users do not use this method to sign in, they'll still be able to use the Teams client, but will be unable to schedule Teams online meetings using the Outlook add-in. You can fix this by doing one of the following:

  • If Modern Authentication is not configured for your organization, you should configure Modern Authentication.
  • If Modern Authentication is configured, but they canceled out on the dialog box, you should instruct users to sign in again using multi-factor authentication.

To learn more about how to configure authentication, see Identity models and authentication in Microsoft Teams.

Enable private meetings

How To Teach Using Microsoft Teams

Allow scheduling for private meetings must be enabled in the Microsoft Teams admin center for the add-in to get deployed. In the admin center, go to Meetings > Meeting Policies, and in the General section, toggle Allow scheduling private meetings to On.)

The Teams client installs the correct add-in by determining if users need the 32-bit or 64-bit version.

Note

Users might need to restart Outlook after an installation or upgrade of Teams to get the latest add-in.​

Teams upgrade policy and the Teams Meeting add-in for Outlook

Customers can choose their upgrade journey from Skype for Business to Teams. Tenant admins can use the Teams co-existence mode to define this journey for their users. Tenant admins have the option to enable users to use Teams alongside Skype for Business (Islands mode).

When users who are in Island mode schedule a meeting in Outlook, they typically expect to be able to choose whether to schedule a Skype for Business or a Teams meeting. In Outlook on the web, Outlook Windows, and Outlook Mac, users see both Skype for Business and Teams add-ins when in Islands mode by default. You can configure a Teams meeting policy setting to control whether users in Islands mode can only use the Teams Meeting add-in or both the Teams Meeting and Skype for Business Meeting add-ins.

Due to certain limitations in the initial release, Outlook mobile can only support creating Skype for Business or Teams meetings. See the following table for details.

Coexistence mode in the Teams admin centerDefault meetings provider in Outlook mobile
IslandsSkype for Business
Skype for Business onlySkype for Business
Skype for Business with Teams collaborationSkype for Business
Skype for Business with Teams collaboration and meetingsTeams
Teams onlyTeams

Set whether users in Islands mode can only use the Teams Meeting add-in or both the Teams Meeting and Skype for Business Meeting add-ins

As an admin, you can configure a Teams meeting policy setting to control which Outlook meeting add-in is used for users who are in Islands mode. You can specify whether users can only use the Teams Meeting add-in or both the Teams Meeting and Skype for Business Meeting add-ins to schedule meetings in Outlook.

You can only apply this policy to users who are in Islands mode and have the AllowOutlookAddIn parameter set to True in their Teams meeting policy. For steps on how to set this policy, see Meeting policy settings - General.

Other considerations

The Teams Meeting add-in is still building functionality, so be aware of the following:

  • The Teams Meeting add-in requires an Exchange mailbox for the primary user scheduling the meeting. Ensure that you have at least one Exchange mailbox configured in your Outlook profile and use it to schedule Teams meetings with the add-in. For Exchange requirements, see How Exchange and Teams interact.
  • The add-in is for scheduled meetings with specific participants, not for meetings in a channel. Channel meetings must be scheduled from within Teams.
  • The add-in will not work if an Authentication Proxy is in the network path of the user's PC and Teams Services.
  • Users can't schedule live events from within Outlook. Go to Teams to schedule live events. For more information, see What are Microsoft Teams live events?.

Learn more about meetings and calling in Microsoft Teams.

Troubleshooting

Use the following steps to troubleshoot issues with the Teams Meeting add-in.

Teams Meeting add-in in Outlook for Windows does not show

If you cannot get the Teams Meeting add-in for Outlook to install, try these troubleshooting steps.

Download and run the Microsoft Support Recovery Assistant to perform automated troubleshooting steps and fixes.

Alternatively, perform the following steps manually:

  • Windows 7 users must install the Update for Universal C Runtime in Windows for the Teams Meeting add-in to work.
  • Check that the user has a Teams Upgrade policy which enables scheduling meetings in Teams. See Upgrade from Skype for Business to Teams for more details.
  • Check that the user has a Teams Meeting policy that permits the Outlook Add-in. See Meeting policy settings - General for more details.
  • Ensure the user has the Teams desktop client installed. The meeting add-in will not be installed when only using the Teams web client.
  • Ensure the user has Outlook 2013 or later installed.
  • Make sure the user has permission to execute regsvr32.exe.
  • Ensure that all available updates for Outlook desktop client have been applied.
  • Follow these steps:
    • Restart the Teams desktop client.
    • Sign out and then sign back in to the Teams desktop client.
    • Restart the Outlook desktop client. (Make sure Outlook isn't running in admin mode.)

If you still don't see the add-in, make sure that it isn't disabled in Outlook.

  • In Outlook, choose File and then Options.
  • Select the Add-ins tab of Outlook Options dialog box.
  • Confirm that Microsoft Teams Meeting Add-in for Microsoft Office is listed in the Active Application Add-ins list
  • If the Teams Meeting Add-in is listed in the Disabled Application Add-ins list, select COM Add-ins in Manage and then select Go…
  • Set the checkbox next to Microsoft Teams Meeting Add-in for Microsoft Office.
  • Choose OK on all dialog boxes and restart Outlook.

For general guidance about how to manage add-ins, see View, manage, and install add-ins in Office programs.

If the add-in still does not show, use the following steps to verify the registry settings.

Note

Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

  • Launch RegEdit.exe
  • Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOfficeOutlookAddins
  • Verify TeamsAddin.FastConnect exists.
  • Within TeamsAddin.FastConnect, verify LoadBehavior exists and is set to 3.
    • If LoadBehavior has a value other than 3, change it to 3 and restart Outlook.

Delegate scheduling does not work

Using Microsoft Teams Cvr

If your administrator has configured Microsoft Exchange to control access to Exchange Web Server (EWS), a delegate won't be able to schedule a Teams meeting on behalf of the boss. The solution for this configuration is under development and will be released in the future. As a workaround, your administrator can add the following string to the EWS Allow List: 'SchedulingService'.

Using Microsoft Teams Pdf

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